Friday, November 14, 2014

Valor,Band of Brothers,Bo,and Peyton Manning

 Valor, Band of Brothers, Bo Schembechler and Peyton Manning

While I was on my elliptical this morning, I was watching a taped program from a Veterans Day program “Concert of Valor.” While watching this concert, I was moved by the Spirit of the entertainers as well as the audience. It was very patriotic to say the least and that was neat. Early on in the program, an orthopedic surgeon from Truckee, California story was told. After losing one of his two military sons, this surgeon at age 60, wanted to enlist. Initially, he was turned down because of his age, but an intervention by President Bush facilitated his serving. The word valor fits for him and all his fellow comrade veterans.

Valor is defined as exhibiting bravery, especially in battle. The word also suggest heroic courage, being strong and boldness in braving danger. While I was interviewing Mike Keller for my book “Bo’s Warriors” he commented on how he felt connected to his Wolverine teammates and referred to them as “Band of Brothers” Keller made it clear that while playing for Michigan, it felt like being in the military as far as the bonding and love for his teammates was concerned. He was not associating practices and games with actual battle conditions like in Afghanistan or Iraq.

Woody Hayes and Bo Schembechler had no difficulty in providing examples of military generals and historic battles in motivating their players. A key component in forming a band of brothers is the cohesiveness of the group and working for a common goal. Their love, they’re not wanting to let their comrades or teammates down, and submerging their individual egos for the will of the group is unprecedented. Coach Bo Schembechler was a genius at bringing the group and narrowing its focus on the team. For him it was the team, team, and team.

Related to being part of the group is the following: “when you find your trail, keep on it, because that will allow you to know your destination.” This simply means that it may take a while to find your path, your trail or your way before you know where you’re going. Commercials like Joe Montana for the correct shoe; Brett Favre for the correct sock; Peyton Manning for the correct pizza; or some correct drink; or some correct compression device; or some correct exercise equipment may work as a placebo to assist while on your journey. Placebos are fine and good motivators. However, remember that motivation, drive, goal, or valor is found from within. When you have found “your trail,” it’ll be perfectly clear, and I mean perfectly clear. Although the journey may have bumps and turns, the path will become clearer and clearer. You’ll know that you found your own pathway.

 For me, some of those early side trails, intersections, etc. included being part of the football team, becoming a PhD psychologist, finding Ride and Tie, ultra running and connecting. It took a while for me to find my way and I’m sure you will too. Remember the trail is not always clear because our goals change. And it may take a while to know or realize that you’re on the right path. In the meantime, keep moving, laughing, smiling, bonding and appreciating.

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